Why Declawing Cats is Cruel and Unnecessary

5 Replies to “Why Declawing Cats is Cruel and Unnecessary”

  1. Rebecca

    I would like to add that I have often heard that cats that have been declawed are known to have litterbox problems, because the litter bothers their paws. I have found that the sticky tape works just fine for furniture. I used to have a cat who refused to use a scratching post or anything purpose-made for cats to scratch on, but I sacrificed one piece of furniture, put sticky tape on the couch, and it worked out just fine.

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  2. Chelsea

    I have a cat that has been declawed but only his front paws. The only thing I really had to change was the type of litter. He hasn’t had any problems and still plays and everything and he’s almost 6 years old.
    He still acts like he’s scratching the couch and everything else.

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    • ourcatsworld Post author

      Full disclosure…all four of our cats are front-paw declaws. We had it done before we knew what declawing was. They also haven’t had problems, and behave like normal cats; they scratch the scratching posts and everything. However, we’ve recently noticed with our 12-year old that she’s having some spine and shoulder issues, which our vet told us could be from the changes in the way her front paws hit the floor when she walks. We haven’t noticed the same problems with our 15-year old, but that doesn’t mean Aria’s problems are being caused by something else. It’s not a guarantee that declawing will cause problems, but the risk of problems outweighs the benefits of declawing, especially when there are so many ways to teach cats to only scratch approved surfaces. So, because of that, we’re never having another cat declawed.

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    • Rebecca

      Many people don’t realize that cats are absolute masters at hiding pain. This is very well known in the veterinary community. Because their small size makes them potential targets for larger predators, they can’t afford to appear to be weak or vulnerable. This presents issues with both treatment and diagnosis of issues when they arise, since even a calm and relaxed-appearing cat who seems to be doing all her normal activities can be suffering underneath that cool feline exterior. By the time you see visible signs of pain, it is often too late. Personally I have guilt over circumstances in which my past cats ended up suffering, and there is nothing I can do about it now except do everything I can with the knowledge I have to prevent potential suffering when I know it could exist.

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      • ourcatsworld Post author

        Very true. Awhile back, our Chase was very sick with peritonitis (not FIP). For several days I’d been hemming and hawing, trying to decide if his behavior meant he was sick, or maybe I was just imagining things. I took him to the vet anyway, and the vet told us he was in A LOT of pain. After she took an x-ray, she found a lot of fluid and inflammation and couldn’t tell what was wrong, but she suspected a ruptured colon and said he needed emergency surgery. I was dumbfounded – I mean, yeah, we’d been having to coax him to eat food for a few days, but he would eventually eat. He seemed just a little lethargic, but not really enough to tell me that there was definitely something wrong. I assumed the vet was going to tell me I was overreacting when I took him in. I’m glad I did, because while he didn’t have a ruptured colon, he was very, very sick. He was much sicker than I would have imagined just by watching him. He embodies your statement, “Cats are absolute masters at hiding pain.” That goes for all pain.

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